Executive Briefings

Amazon Prime Membership Grows 23 Percent Year-Over-Year, Research Says

The latest membership estimates for Amazon.com's Amazon Prime service show that the e-retailer's bid to consolidate consumer spending onto one platform has now attracted almost one in six Americans, according to independent research by Cowen & Co. In addition to signing up some 50 million Amazon Prime customers, the company expanded into car sales last week, teaming up with Fiat to sell cars in Italy.

Amazon Prime Membership Grows 23 Percent Year-Over-Year, Research Says

Because Amazon doesn't release its Prime membership numbers, third-party researchers such as Cowen & Co make estimates based on polling. Their latest research - based on a sampling of 2,500 U.S. consumers - found that membership had risen by 23 percent year-over-year (y-o-y).

Cowen & Co found that 83 percent of Prime members purchased from Amazon in October, as opposed to 49 percent of U.S. consumers without membership.

The numbers were also good news for Amazon's grocery delivery products with the number of "Grocery and consumable" purchases at Amazon up 12 percent y-o-y. The report spelled bad news for the competition. Wal-Mart, which ratcheted up the competition with Amazon through its $3.3bn purchase of Jet.com in August, saw the same in-kind purchases fall 2 percent. Target did only marginally better, with purchases up 1 percent.

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Because Amazon doesn't release its Prime membership numbers, third-party researchers such as Cowen & Co make estimates based on polling. Their latest research - based on a sampling of 2,500 U.S. consumers - found that membership had risen by 23 percent year-over-year (y-o-y).

Cowen & Co found that 83 percent of Prime members purchased from Amazon in October, as opposed to 49 percent of U.S. consumers without membership.

The numbers were also good news for Amazon's grocery delivery products with the number of "Grocery and consumable" purchases at Amazon up 12 percent y-o-y. The report spelled bad news for the competition. Wal-Mart, which ratcheted up the competition with Amazon through its $3.3bn purchase of Jet.com in August, saw the same in-kind purchases fall 2 percent. Target did only marginally better, with purchases up 1 percent.

Read Full Article

Amazon Prime Membership Grows 23 Percent Year-Over-Year, Research Says