Executive Briefings

Apple Says Workplace Violations Rise Among Its Suppliers, but Overall Compliance Improves

Apple has reported an increase in the number of serious violations of working conditions at factories where its products are manufactured, but says that overall conditions improved.

Apple last week released its latest Progress Report on Supplier Responsibility, an annual accounting of the working and environmental conditions in its supply chain, often in developing nations where enforcement of labor laws and environmental regulations is weak. Most of those facilities are owned by companies that Apple has hired to produce its devices, including iPhones, iPads, Mac computers.

According to Apple, there were 44 “core violations” of its labor policies last year, up from 22 in the previous year. Core violations can include everything from the use of underage workers and involuntary labor to managers intimidating workers.

Apple explained the increase by saying that it is now relying on more new vendors that less familiar with its policies. Apple rectifies problems with its suppliers and works with them to get into compliance with its policies.

Thirty-eight of the core violations last year centered on “labor and human rights,” including labor violations and underage labor. In one case, Apple said that it had discovered that one supplier charged 700 workers in the Philippines a total of $1m in fees to work. Apple said that it forced the supplier to repay the affected workers.

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Apple last week released its latest Progress Report on Supplier Responsibility, an annual accounting of the working and environmental conditions in its supply chain, often in developing nations where enforcement of labor laws and environmental regulations is weak. Most of those facilities are owned by companies that Apple has hired to produce its devices, including iPhones, iPads, Mac computers.

According to Apple, there were 44 “core violations” of its labor policies last year, up from 22 in the previous year. Core violations can include everything from the use of underage workers and involuntary labor to managers intimidating workers.

Apple explained the increase by saying that it is now relying on more new vendors that less familiar with its policies. Apple rectifies problems with its suppliers and works with them to get into compliance with its policies.

Thirty-eight of the core violations last year centered on “labor and human rights,” including labor violations and underage labor. In one case, Apple said that it had discovered that one supplier charged 700 workers in the Philippines a total of $1m in fees to work. Apple said that it forced the supplier to repay the affected workers.

Read full article