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Are You Eating Sustainable Fish? Blockchain May Provide the Answer

Eco-conscious diners can rely on restaurants to tell them their fish comes from a sustainable source, but it can be hard to know for sure.

Are You Eating Sustainable Fish? Blockchain May Provide the Answer

That’s why a new certification system, launched by blockchain company Viant and the World Wild Fund for Nature, is intriguing: It provides a step-by-step way to verify a fish’s journey from the ocean to the market to the dinner plate.

The new initiative, announced in late December, is the latest example of how blockchain technology — a type of software that creates a permanent, tamper proof ledger — can transform supply chains and preserve the integrity of the food supply.

In the case of sustainable fish, you can see the beginning of the process in the photo above. The picture shows a wild yellowfin tuna caught off the waters of Fiji, which has been tagged with a QR code supplied by Viant.

The code means the fish is ready to be be logged into Viant’s blockchain system, which will record its progress to Los Angeles and allow groups like the WWF and its partner SeaQuest to verify the harvest is from a sustainable fishery.

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That’s why a new certification system, launched by blockchain company Viant and the World Wild Fund for Nature, is intriguing: It provides a step-by-step way to verify a fish’s journey from the ocean to the market to the dinner plate.

The new initiative, announced in late December, is the latest example of how blockchain technology — a type of software that creates a permanent, tamper proof ledger — can transform supply chains and preserve the integrity of the food supply.

In the case of sustainable fish, you can see the beginning of the process in the photo above. The picture shows a wild yellowfin tuna caught off the waters of Fiji, which has been tagged with a QR code supplied by Viant.

The code means the fish is ready to be be logged into Viant’s blockchain system, which will record its progress to Los Angeles and allow groups like the WWF and its partner SeaQuest to verify the harvest is from a sustainable fishery.

Read Full Article

Are You Eating Sustainable Fish? Blockchain May Provide the Answer