Executive Briefings

Automotive Industry to See Robust Growth in Market for Stop-Start Systems

Vehicles with stop-start capability will account for 55 percent of all light-duty vehicles sold by 2024, increasing from 22 percent in 2015, according to Navigant Research.

Stop-start systems, which allow the engine to stop automatically instead of idling when a vehicle is stationary and to quickly restart when it is time to resume driving, are gaining increased acceptance from both automakers and vehicle owners. Besides providing greater fuel economy, advanced stop-start functionality also requires that other systems are also electrified and made more efficient.

"The basic stop-start system is gradually evolving into one piece of a multifaceted approach to improving fuel economy in light duty vehicles," says David Alexander, senior research analyst with Navigant Research. "This is spurring the development and implementation of ancillary systems, such as air conditioning, power steering and brake assistance, that are only activated when required, rather than being a small but constant drain on engine output."

North America has been a target market for SSVs since the technology was embraced in Western Europe, according to the report, but initial roll-outs were met with a wave of consumer resistance. Manufacturers are now refining system performance to appeal to American drivers. Smoother and faster operation is key to gaining acceptance for stop-start systems in North America, the report concludes.

An executive summary of the report is available for free download on the Navigant Research website.

Source: Navigant Research

Stop-start systems, which allow the engine to stop automatically instead of idling when a vehicle is stationary and to quickly restart when it is time to resume driving, are gaining increased acceptance from both automakers and vehicle owners. Besides providing greater fuel economy, advanced stop-start functionality also requires that other systems are also electrified and made more efficient.

"The basic stop-start system is gradually evolving into one piece of a multifaceted approach to improving fuel economy in light duty vehicles," says David Alexander, senior research analyst with Navigant Research. "This is spurring the development and implementation of ancillary systems, such as air conditioning, power steering and brake assistance, that are only activated when required, rather than being a small but constant drain on engine output."

North America has been a target market for SSVs since the technology was embraced in Western Europe, according to the report, but initial roll-outs were met with a wave of consumer resistance. Manufacturers are now refining system performance to appeal to American drivers. Smoother and faster operation is key to gaining acceptance for stop-start systems in North America, the report concludes.

An executive summary of the report is available for free download on the Navigant Research website.

Source: Navigant Research