Executive Briefings

Bankers and Treasurers Aren't Sleeping Well These Nights. Here Is What's Keeping Them Awake

What keeps corporate bankers and treasurers up at night? A recent JPMorgan Chase survey measured the "angst" factor in that sector. The 502 respondents were from all over the world. According to JPMorgan Chase, corporations appear most concerned about optimizing cash flow and improving treasury efficiency. Such fears are greatest in North America, where 38 percent of respondents gave a "four" or "five" score (meaning nightmares) to that category, versus 33 percent for Western Europe and Asia. (The most highly stressed individuals were from companies with sales of less than $1bn.) One corporate treasurer based in France said the inability to view all of the company's global bank accounts would be "the biggest disaster." Another, based in the Netherlands, called for more accurate information, along with more efficient cash concentration and repatriation of funds. "We need to know what lies ahead to be able to lower borrowing cost effectively," he said. Survey participants also expressed dissatisfaction with their companies' technology prowess. A lack of integration still inhibits the easy flow of information through treasury to the bank, they said.

Visit www.jpmorganchase.com.

What keeps corporate bankers and treasurers up at night? A recent JPMorgan Chase survey measured the "angst" factor in that sector. The 502 respondents were from all over the world. According to JPMorgan Chase, corporations appear most concerned about optimizing cash flow and improving treasury efficiency. Such fears are greatest in North America, where 38 percent of respondents gave a "four" or "five" score (meaning nightmares) to that category, versus 33 percent for Western Europe and Asia. (The most highly stressed individuals were from companies with sales of less than $1bn.) One corporate treasurer based in France said the inability to view all of the company's global bank accounts would be "the biggest disaster." Another, based in the Netherlands, called for more accurate information, along with more efficient cash concentration and repatriation of funds. "We need to know what lies ahead to be able to lower borrowing cost effectively," he said. Survey participants also expressed dissatisfaction with their companies' technology prowess. A lack of integration still inhibits the easy flow of information through treasury to the bank, they said.

Visit www.jpmorganchase.com.