Executive Briefings

Beyond Skills, Precision Manufacturing Needs Passion

The "skills gap" is a problem that manufacturers have been working to address for much of the past decade: new accreditation programs, expanding training curricula and updated certification standards have had some positive effects in filling the gap. But those approaches are based on addressing manufacturers' needs, emphasizing employment opportunities and other practical advantages. Addressing the issue from the employees' point of view may require more "passion."

Glebar Co. is a manufacturer that says it's tuned to these types of issues: It is a precision manufacturer that designs and builds high-tech machinery for use by precision manufacturers.

Ramsey, N.J.-based Glebar designs and builds modular CNC machining systems for grinding, micro-grinding and profile metrology (gauging) systems for machine shops and other fabricators. Glebar knows its customers’ concerns — and many of those are its own concerns, too.

Over the past several months Glebar has been seeing its skills gap narrow thanks to the passionate approach to machining processes shown by a 26-year-old who is new to the profession, and right at home.

“A few weeks into working at Glebar I was asked to do a refurbishing job,” Matt Behre recalled recently. “A customer needed to replace worn sleeves inside the bores of several tubes that were a part of some type of manifold. This required boring out the old sleeves and pressing in new ones. Extracting the old ones and maintaining the original I.D. within tolerance wasn't too bad, but turning and boring the new sleeves with a required 0.010-in. wall thickness got tricky fast.

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Glebar Co. is a manufacturer that says it's tuned to these types of issues: It is a precision manufacturer that designs and builds high-tech machinery for use by precision manufacturers.

Ramsey, N.J.-based Glebar designs and builds modular CNC machining systems for grinding, micro-grinding and profile metrology (gauging) systems for machine shops and other fabricators. Glebar knows its customers’ concerns — and many of those are its own concerns, too.

Over the past several months Glebar has been seeing its skills gap narrow thanks to the passionate approach to machining processes shown by a 26-year-old who is new to the profession, and right at home.

“A few weeks into working at Glebar I was asked to do a refurbishing job,” Matt Behre recalled recently. “A customer needed to replace worn sleeves inside the bores of several tubes that were a part of some type of manifold. This required boring out the old sleeves and pressing in new ones. Extracting the old ones and maintaining the original I.D. within tolerance wasn't too bad, but turning and boring the new sleeves with a required 0.010-in. wall thickness got tricky fast.

Read Full Article