Executive Briefings

BIS Outlines New Guidelines on Antiboycott Penalties Under Export Administration Regulations

The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, has published new guidelines for the assessment of antiboycott penalties against exporters. The agency lays out procedures for the handling of cases that involve voluntary self-disclosure of violations of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). The guidelines address how BIS determines the appropriate penalty for settlement of such cases. "The Department of Commerce policy of opposing restrictive trade practices or unsanctioned boycotts, including against Israel, is clear-cut," said Mario Mancuso, undersecretary of commerce for industry and security. "Publishing the penalty and voluntary self-disclosure guidelines provides additional clarity and is a valuable part of our continuing efforts to educate U.S. businesses about their responsibilities." During fiscal year 2006, nine companies agreed to pay civil penalties totaling $95,950 to settle allegations that they violated the EAR's antiboycott provisions, BIS said.
http://www.bis.doc.gov

The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, has published new guidelines for the assessment of antiboycott penalties against exporters. The agency lays out procedures for the handling of cases that involve voluntary self-disclosure of violations of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). The guidelines address how BIS determines the appropriate penalty for settlement of such cases. "The Department of Commerce policy of opposing restrictive trade practices or unsanctioned boycotts, including against Israel, is clear-cut," said Mario Mancuso, undersecretary of commerce for industry and security. "Publishing the penalty and voluntary self-disclosure guidelines provides additional clarity and is a valuable part of our continuing efforts to educate U.S. businesses about their responsibilities." During fiscal year 2006, nine companies agreed to pay civil penalties totaling $95,950 to settle allegations that they violated the EAR's antiboycott provisions, BIS said.
http://www.bis.doc.gov