Executive Briefings

Brands Should Keep Supply Chains in Turkey to Help Refugees, Human Rights Group Says

Fashion brands are being urged to keep their supply chains in Turkey, despite the widespread risk of Syrian refugees being exploited in supplier factories, according to the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC). There has been "talk of brands shifting their purchasing elsewhere" amid increasing scrutiny and criticism of supply chains in Turkey, the BHRRC says, but responsible sourcing could provide decent work and valuable wages to Turks and Syrians.

Although more needs to be done to fix the "endemic" exploitation of refugees, BHRRC said: "There is a real opportunity for international business to help bring greater prosperity and security to long-suffering refugees, and the Turkish com­munities who have welcomed them."

The exploitation of refugees was brought to the public's attention recently in a BBC Panorama expose that found child refugees working in factories supplying Marks & Spencer (M&S) and ASOS.

However, as early as December last year, BHRRC was surveying fashion firms to find out how they were responding to the supply chain risk refugees in Turkey created. A subsequent report in February found few had engaged with the issue and fewer were taking pragmatic steps.

In a follow-up report BHRRC found there was still a "gulf" between those taking steps to eradicate exploitation and “a long tail of laggard brands.” A survey received responses from brands including Adidas, Gap Inc, M&S and Primark, among others.

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Although more needs to be done to fix the "endemic" exploitation of refugees, BHRRC said: "There is a real opportunity for international business to help bring greater prosperity and security to long-suffering refugees, and the Turkish com­munities who have welcomed them."

The exploitation of refugees was brought to the public's attention recently in a BBC Panorama expose that found child refugees working in factories supplying Marks & Spencer (M&S) and ASOS.

However, as early as December last year, BHRRC was surveying fashion firms to find out how they were responding to the supply chain risk refugees in Turkey created. A subsequent report in February found few had engaged with the issue and fewer were taking pragmatic steps.

In a follow-up report BHRRC found there was still a "gulf" between those taking steps to eradicate exploitation and “a long tail of laggard brands.” A survey received responses from brands including Adidas, Gap Inc, M&S and Primark, among others.

Read Full Article