Executive Briefings

BT's Role in the Global Supply Chain

BT Global Services provides managed networked IT services for business and government organizations around the world. Its expertise begins at home, says Keith Sherry, the company's general manager of supply chain solutions. BT procures some $16bn in products and services for 30,000 engineers and 1.3 million customers.

Given that its own supply chain is so huge, it's no surprise that a company like BT Global Services would understand the many hurdles that supply chain managers everywhere must deal with. "We recognize that there are a lot of supply chain challenges," Sherry says.

End-to-end visibility is the key to meeting those difficulties head on, he says. Regardless of industry vertical, many companies have already dealt with the low-hanging fruit in supply chain optimization. Yet many challenges remain. "There is more cost to be removed. And there are additional things to deal with, such as the green agenda, sustainability, how to track our carbon footprints.

"What about unrest in the middle East and the increased risk of doing business there? We have to mitigate that as much as we can."

The ever rising cost of oil is still another challenge or risk, says Sherry. "The question is, how to remove costs further there? End-to-end visibility is the foundation to deliver a whole host of applications and to actually deliver solutions to these problems."

The same with counterfeiting, he says. It has grown significantly; so much so that it is estimated that $1.7tr in counterfeit goods will be sold by 2015. While the problem originates in many places, Sherry says 8 percent of China's global GDP is attributed to counterfeit items.

Comprehensive visibility would follow trucks, pallets and the items shipped through the entire supply chain they have traveled on.

Traceability is critically important when it comes to the food and beverage industry and pharmaceuticals, Sherry says. End-to-ed visibility in those verticals can save lives.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: Supply Chain Visibility, RFID, Wireless, Bar Code & Voice, Technology, End-To-End Visibility, Risk Management, Counterfeit Goods

 

Given that its own supply chain is so huge, it's no surprise that a company like BT Global Services would understand the many hurdles that supply chain managers everywhere must deal with. "We recognize that there are a lot of supply chain challenges," Sherry says.

End-to-end visibility is the key to meeting those difficulties head on, he says. Regardless of industry vertical, many companies have already dealt with the low-hanging fruit in supply chain optimization. Yet many challenges remain. "There is more cost to be removed. And there are additional things to deal with, such as the green agenda, sustainability, how to track our carbon footprints.

"What about unrest in the middle East and the increased risk of doing business there? We have to mitigate that as much as we can."

The ever rising cost of oil is still another challenge or risk, says Sherry. "The question is, how to remove costs further there? End-to-end visibility is the foundation to deliver a whole host of applications and to actually deliver solutions to these problems."

The same with counterfeiting, he says. It has grown significantly; so much so that it is estimated that $1.7tr in counterfeit goods will be sold by 2015. While the problem originates in many places, Sherry says 8 percent of China's global GDP is attributed to counterfeit items.

Comprehensive visibility would follow trucks, pallets and the items shipped through the entire supply chain they have traveled on.

Traceability is critically important when it comes to the food and beverage industry and pharmaceuticals, Sherry says. End-to-ed visibility in those verticals can save lives.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: Supply Chain Visibility, RFID, Wireless, Bar Code & Voice, Technology, End-To-End Visibility, Risk Management, Counterfeit Goods