Executive Briefings

Celebrating Four Generations of Supply Chain Managers

2012 is a big year. It is the 30th anniversary for supply chain management. The first published document using the term "supply chain management" was issued in 1982. And it's time to celebrate the pioneers as we are currently training the fourth generation of supply chain leaders.

The first generation is passing the baton and leaving the workforce. They fought for a place at a table - any table - to talk about supply chain management. They will leave knowing that there is now a supply chain organization.

The second generation was the boots on the ground building global supply chains. This will be the first generation that will sit at the table as Chief Supply Chain Officers. The third generation is currently plugging away at entry-level jobs. They are trying to apply what they have learned in school to the real world. The fourth generation is busy completing their courses at universities. In the passing of the baton, there is a skill shortage in the second generation and a need to train and build talent in emerging markets. Current graduates are getting jobs before they graduate with higher salaries than prior years. It is a time to celebrate the early pioneers and reflect on the changes that have happened in the discipline.

Read Full Article

 

2012 is a big year. It is the 30th anniversary for supply chain management. The first published document using the term "supply chain management" was issued in 1982. And it's time to celebrate the pioneers as we are currently training the fourth generation of supply chain leaders.

The first generation is passing the baton and leaving the workforce. They fought for a place at a table - any table - to talk about supply chain management. They will leave knowing that there is now a supply chain organization.

The second generation was the boots on the ground building global supply chains. This will be the first generation that will sit at the table as Chief Supply Chain Officers. The third generation is currently plugging away at entry-level jobs. They are trying to apply what they have learned in school to the real world. The fourth generation is busy completing their courses at universities. In the passing of the baton, there is a skill shortage in the second generation and a need to train and build talent in emerging markets. Current graduates are getting jobs before they graduate with higher salaries than prior years. It is a time to celebrate the early pioneers and reflect on the changes that have happened in the discipline.

Read Full Article