Executive Briefings

Chemical Industry Expresses Safety Concerns With Use of Drones

Thanks to advancing capabilities and greater accessibility, the use of drones is continuing to increase. In fact, global drone sales reached $4.3m in 2015, a 167-percent jump from two years ago. This surge should come as no surprise as people find more and more useful ways to put drones to work.

Chemical Industry Expresses Safety Concerns With Use of Drones

Of course, this increased use can present some new challenges when it comes to ensuring the safe and responsible use of drones. That is where the Federal Aviation Administration comes in. The skyrocketing use of drones has gained the attention of regulators, and the FAA recently proposed a new set of rules to try to tackle some of the issues surrounding the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or "drones."

In a nutshell, the FAA's proposed regulatory framework would allow for the routine use of certain small UAS (under 55 pounds) in conducting non-recreational/commercial operations. The rule would limit these types of uses to daylight and visual-line-of-sight operations. It also addresses height restrictions, operator certification, optional use of a visual observer, aircraft registration and marking, and operational limits.

While the FAA is off to a good start, the American Chemistry Council (ACC) recently filed comments offering suggestions on how to improve the proposal, especially where it concerns the safety of chemical facilities.

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Of course, this increased use can present some new challenges when it comes to ensuring the safe and responsible use of drones. That is where the Federal Aviation Administration comes in. The skyrocketing use of drones has gained the attention of regulators, and the FAA recently proposed a new set of rules to try to tackle some of the issues surrounding the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or "drones."

In a nutshell, the FAA's proposed regulatory framework would allow for the routine use of certain small UAS (under 55 pounds) in conducting non-recreational/commercial operations. The rule would limit these types of uses to daylight and visual-line-of-sight operations. It also addresses height restrictions, operator certification, optional use of a visual observer, aircraft registration and marking, and operational limits.

While the FAA is off to a good start, the American Chemistry Council (ACC) recently filed comments offering suggestions on how to improve the proposal, especially where it concerns the safety of chemical facilities.

Read Full Article

Chemical Industry Expresses Safety Concerns With Use of Drones