Executive Briefings

China Voices Concern About Anti-Dumping Measures Imposed by Mexico, Canada and the European Union

China has criticized the anti-dumping measures imposed on a large number of its goods by Mexico, Canada and the European Union. According to the World Trade Organization (WTO), China urged Mexico to take "positive and proactive steps" to get discussions about the matter back on track. A protocol between the two countries lapsed in December of 2007. Mexico responded that it would continue bilateral consultations with China "to achieve a mutually acceptable solution." Mexico had imposed anti-dumping measures on many Chinese products prior to China's joining the WTO. Its tariff rates range from 35 percent to 72 percent, with higher levels for processed products. Canada, meanwhile, has taken anti-dumping action against Chinese seamless carbon or alloy steel oil and gas well casings. China claimed that the action failed to take into consideration a large amount of information reportedly showing that the industry in question was not controlled by the government. In 2006, the Canadian government requested a WTO panel on China's policies toward imported auto parts. As for the EU, China complained of discriminatory treatment against Chinese firms compared with those from Europe, with regard to the treatment of imported iron and steel fasteners, citric acid and air compressors. The two trading partners have engaged in disputes on a number of fronts. Earlier this year, the EU asked for WTO consultations about China's treatment of foreign financial-information suppliers.
http://www.wto.org

China has criticized the anti-dumping measures imposed on a large number of its goods by Mexico, Canada and the European Union. According to the World Trade Organization (WTO), China urged Mexico to take "positive and proactive steps" to get discussions about the matter back on track. A protocol between the two countries lapsed in December of 2007. Mexico responded that it would continue bilateral consultations with China "to achieve a mutually acceptable solution." Mexico had imposed anti-dumping measures on many Chinese products prior to China's joining the WTO. Its tariff rates range from 35 percent to 72 percent, with higher levels for processed products. Canada, meanwhile, has taken anti-dumping action against Chinese seamless carbon or alloy steel oil and gas well casings. China claimed that the action failed to take into consideration a large amount of information reportedly showing that the industry in question was not controlled by the government. In 2006, the Canadian government requested a WTO panel on China's policies toward imported auto parts. As for the EU, China complained of discriminatory treatment against Chinese firms compared with those from Europe, with regard to the treatment of imported iron and steel fasteners, citric acid and air compressors. The two trading partners have engaged in disputes on a number of fronts. Earlier this year, the EU asked for WTO consultations about China's treatment of foreign financial-information suppliers.
http://www.wto.org