Executive Briefings

Chinese New Year Has Great Affect on Shipping

Doing business in other countries means working within the cultural context. Chinese New Year, also known as the Lunar New Year or the Spring Festival, which started Feb. 10, is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays.

Manufacturing plants across China typically shut down and tens of millions of workers make long trips back to their home towns from the industrial cities where their jobs are. It has a huge impact on global supply chains originating in China and it's not always back to business as usual, before and after the 15-day celebration. The celebrations are also expected to affect port operations in terms of loading, barging schedule and possibly product availability.

Container shipping lines servicing the Asia-Europe trade lanes are moving to cut back on capacity, maybe even skipping a series of sailings during these two weeks, in preparation of volume lulls following the start of the holiday on February 10.

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Keywords: supply chain management, supply chain disruption, supply chain risk management, cultural sensitivity

Manufacturing plants across China typically shut down and tens of millions of workers make long trips back to their home towns from the industrial cities where their jobs are. It has a huge impact on global supply chains originating in China and it's not always back to business as usual, before and after the 15-day celebration. The celebrations are also expected to affect port operations in terms of loading, barging schedule and possibly product availability.

Container shipping lines servicing the Asia-Europe trade lanes are moving to cut back on capacity, maybe even skipping a series of sailings during these two weeks, in preparation of volume lulls following the start of the holiday on February 10.

Read Full Article


Keywords: supply chain management, supply chain disruption, supply chain risk management, cultural sensitivity