Executive Briefings

Clean Energy Could Reduce Cost of Desalination Process

Desalination is typically an energy-intensive - and thus expensive - way to produce freshwater, which is one of the reasons it has been slow to take off as a widespread solution to water shortages.

This is what makes renewable energy-powered desalination so desirable, and will play a key role in the market’s growth, according to a Lux Research report.

Emerging Green Desalination: Solar and Wave Technologies” says desalination will grow to 140 million cubic meters in 2020, reflecting soaring demand for freshwater and growing viability of renewable energy technologies such as solar and wind.

“There is an opportunity in the tens of billions of dollars for renewable energy in desalination, Lux Research analyst and report author Thomas Ooi said. “The process is energy-intensive and current world production consumes more than 200 million kWh per day, none of which is renewable. We estimate global desalination capacity to reach about 140 million cubic meters per day by 2020 at a conservative 8 percent growth.”

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This is what makes renewable energy-powered desalination so desirable, and will play a key role in the market’s growth, according to a Lux Research report.

Emerging Green Desalination: Solar and Wave Technologies” says desalination will grow to 140 million cubic meters in 2020, reflecting soaring demand for freshwater and growing viability of renewable energy technologies such as solar and wind.

“There is an opportunity in the tens of billions of dollars for renewable energy in desalination, Lux Research analyst and report author Thomas Ooi said. “The process is energy-intensive and current world production consumes more than 200 million kWh per day, none of which is renewable. We estimate global desalination capacity to reach about 140 million cubic meters per day by 2020 at a conservative 8 percent growth.”

Read Full Article