Executive Briefings

Cloud 'Not the End of IT' HP Exec Says

Cloud computing isn't another name for "utility computing" or just a buzzword that will be replaced by another term. "The cloud is the next evolution of the Internet," says Daniels, Hewlett-Packard's CTO for cloud computing and VP of cloud strategy.
Part of Daniels' responsibility is explaining to customers how they should think about their future and cloud computing.
Effectively, the world is cleaving in two, he says. There's the traditional world of the enterprise data center, which will continue to exist, and there is a new external supply of compute power and services accessible over the Internet. The data center is almost always on the company's premises and contains servers and networks dedicated to particular applications and tasks. The cloud is off-premises, and its resources are primarily shared across many customers' tasks and can be expanded upon demand to meet traffic increases.
"Virtually every enterprise will operate in hybrid mode," with some of its operations on-premises and some in the cloud, he predicted. Contrary to some theories put forth, he said cloud computing is not a replacement for the data center. "The idea that we're going to one day throw a switch and move everything out to one of a small number of external data centers, located next to a low-cost power source, is nonsensical. It's not going to happen. Cloud computing is not the end of IT," he said.
Source: Intelligent Enterprise

Cloud computing isn't another name for "utility computing" or just a buzzword that will be replaced by another term. "The cloud is the next evolution of the Internet," says Daniels, Hewlett-Packard's CTO for cloud computing and VP of cloud strategy.
Part of Daniels' responsibility is explaining to customers how they should think about their future and cloud computing.
Effectively, the world is cleaving in two, he says. There's the traditional world of the enterprise data center, which will continue to exist, and there is a new external supply of compute power and services accessible over the Internet. The data center is almost always on the company's premises and contains servers and networks dedicated to particular applications and tasks. The cloud is off-premises, and its resources are primarily shared across many customers' tasks and can be expanded upon demand to meet traffic increases.
"Virtually every enterprise will operate in hybrid mode," with some of its operations on-premises and some in the cloud, he predicted. Contrary to some theories put forth, he said cloud computing is not a replacement for the data center. "The idea that we're going to one day throw a switch and move everything out to one of a small number of external data centers, located next to a low-cost power source, is nonsensical. It's not going to happen. Cloud computing is not the end of IT," he said.
Source: Intelligent Enterprise