Executive Briefings

Could 3D Printing Be the Future of Airplane Parts?

Will the wonders of 3D printing ever cease? With each passing day, something revolutionary seems to come off the machine's printing bed, be it a life-size Ultron helmet (OK, maybe that's not revolutionary), a prosthetic shell for a tortoise or a Shelby Cobra sports car. This time, it's more than 1,000 airplane parts for the Airbus A350 XWB jet.

Could 3D Printing Be the Future of Airplane Parts?

Manufactured by the U.S.-Israeli firm Stratasys on a FDM 3D printer, the parts take advantage of the new lightweight, but strong, materials coming into use today, like Airbus-certified ULTEM 9085 resin, which is flame, smoke and toxicity compliant, as well.

Speed of production is the other major appeal of 3D printing for Airbus. In fact, efforts to make a deadline inspired Airbus to turn to Stratasys, which was not only able to make the parts on time and cheaply, but also with up to 90 percent less raw material and energy. For Dan Yalon, executive vice president of business development, marketing and vertical solutions at Stratasys, the 3D-printed parts represent the future of airplane production.

Read Full Article

Manufactured by the U.S.-Israeli firm Stratasys on a FDM 3D printer, the parts take advantage of the new lightweight, but strong, materials coming into use today, like Airbus-certified ULTEM 9085 resin, which is flame, smoke and toxicity compliant, as well.

Speed of production is the other major appeal of 3D printing for Airbus. In fact, efforts to make a deadline inspired Airbus to turn to Stratasys, which was not only able to make the parts on time and cheaply, but also with up to 90 percent less raw material and energy. For Dan Yalon, executive vice president of business development, marketing and vertical solutions at Stratasys, the 3D-printed parts represent the future of airplane production.

Read Full Article

Could 3D Printing Be the Future of Airplane Parts?