Executive Briefings

Could Canada One Day See a Barge Network Span the Country for Moving Natural Gas to Asia?

While rail lines and highways proliferate across most of Canada and the U.S., much freight moves by water within the North American continent. Such maritime operations prevail on the Great Lakes, along the St. Lawrence Seaway and along the Mississippi River. New developments in hydroelectric power, barge-train technology, articulated ship technology and the mining industries could create a basis to develop a future barge canal that would connect parts of Western Canada to Hudson Bay and to the Beaufort Sea.

Canada has indicated a willingness to export compressed-liquefied natural gas (LNG) to Asian markets. A massive well of natural gas is believed to exist near the mouth of the Mackenzie River, at the Beaufort Sea, which is navigable for a few months every year. The future operation of resource ships to NW Canada opens the door to expand export operations involving other natural resources. Several mines operate across Western Canada, in close proximity to rivers that could be developed into navigable barge canals.

Barge trains could carry ore and mining products along the Mackenzie River to its mouth, where barge-to-ship transfer of bulk cargo may occur. In the absence of a pipeline, barge trains could carry LNG along the Mackenzie River during summer, to southern and southeastern destinations where it may be transferred into pipelines. There may be future prospects to develop the Port of Tuktoyaktuk for commercial shipping.

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Keywords: Canada, Ocean Transportation, Transportation & Distribution, Third-Party Logistics, Global Logistics, Logistics, Canadian natural gas, natural gas distribution in Canada, Canadian LNG shipments

Canada has indicated a willingness to export compressed-liquefied natural gas (LNG) to Asian markets. A massive well of natural gas is believed to exist near the mouth of the Mackenzie River, at the Beaufort Sea, which is navigable for a few months every year. The future operation of resource ships to NW Canada opens the door to expand export operations involving other natural resources. Several mines operate across Western Canada, in close proximity to rivers that could be developed into navigable barge canals.

Barge trains could carry ore and mining products along the Mackenzie River to its mouth, where barge-to-ship transfer of bulk cargo may occur. In the absence of a pipeline, barge trains could carry LNG along the Mackenzie River during summer, to southern and southeastern destinations where it may be transferred into pipelines. There may be future prospects to develop the Port of Tuktoyaktuk for commercial shipping.

Read Full Article


Keywords: Canada, Ocean Transportation, Transportation & Distribution, Third-Party Logistics, Global Logistics, Logistics, Canadian natural gas, natural gas distribution in Canada, Canadian LNG shipments