Executive Briefings

Database Created on Toxicity of 10,000 Chemicals Used in Europe

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have created a safety database on 10,000 chemicals registered in Europe for predicting the toxicity of many of the 90,000 or more other substances in consumer products.

With the database, explained online in the Alternatives to Animal Experiments journal, the researchers aim to help regulators, manufacturers and scientists by providing idea about whether chemicals, for which little research is done, are harmful or not.

The database, created on the basis of 816,000 research studies, also includes information about the hazardous nature of the surveyed chemicals to the humans.

Bloomberg School Evidence-based Toxicology chair and study leader Thomas Hartung said: "There are 100,000 chemicals in products we use every day and we are missing 90 percent of the safety information we need.

"It would take billions of dollars to test every one of them, which is very cost prohibitive. To address this, we have come up with a computer model that can tell us which chemicals are similar to untested ones to give us an idea of what types of hazards they are likely to pose."

Since 2007, the European Chemical Agency has been registering chemical compounds including solvents, detergents, colorants and food additives as per the REACH regulation.

With the help of data taken from the European Chemical Agency, the group created a map and grouped chemicals by their known toxicities.

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With the database, explained online in the Alternatives to Animal Experiments journal, the researchers aim to help regulators, manufacturers and scientists by providing idea about whether chemicals, for which little research is done, are harmful or not.

The database, created on the basis of 816,000 research studies, also includes information about the hazardous nature of the surveyed chemicals to the humans.

Bloomberg School Evidence-based Toxicology chair and study leader Thomas Hartung said: "There are 100,000 chemicals in products we use every day and we are missing 90 percent of the safety information we need.

"It would take billions of dollars to test every one of them, which is very cost prohibitive. To address this, we have come up with a computer model that can tell us which chemicals are similar to untested ones to give us an idea of what types of hazards they are likely to pose."

Since 2007, the European Chemical Agency has been registering chemical compounds including solvents, detergents, colorants and food additives as per the REACH regulation.

With the help of data taken from the European Chemical Agency, the group created a map and grouped chemicals by their known toxicities.

Read Full Article