Executive Briefings

Do You Back Up Your Enterprise Data? No, Of course Not.

There's no better advertisement for data backup and technical disaster planning than, well, a disaster. Though it's only been a year since many unprepared businesses were ground to a halt by ice storms, John Parsons, CEO of Perimeter Technology, says the return of winter hasn't caused a surge of people wanting their data protected. "You'd think that more people would get concerned about it during the winter, but the rushes happen when a big event occurs," he says. Parsons and other data professionals, however, said business is steady overall as more individuals and businesses become more data-dependent.
Damon DoRemus, president of Geek Rescue, says the most common computer problem brought to his company is a loss of data, often from a failing hard drive. He says a study by Google indicated that hard drive failure rates go up with age, no matter how often the drive is used. Yet most users don't back up irreplaceable files or pictures. "You should back up a local copy and take another copy to your grandmother's house, but nobody does that," he says.
Even many businesses whose survival hinges on constant access to data and Internet services don't back up, says Mike Bacher of Tulsa Connect. "A lot of companies, unless something hits them in the face, they won't prepare," he said.
Source: CIO Today

There's no better advertisement for data backup and technical disaster planning than, well, a disaster. Though it's only been a year since many unprepared businesses were ground to a halt by ice storms, John Parsons, CEO of Perimeter Technology, says the return of winter hasn't caused a surge of people wanting their data protected. "You'd think that more people would get concerned about it during the winter, but the rushes happen when a big event occurs," he says. Parsons and other data professionals, however, said business is steady overall as more individuals and businesses become more data-dependent.
Damon DoRemus, president of Geek Rescue, says the most common computer problem brought to his company is a loss of data, often from a failing hard drive. He says a study by Google indicated that hard drive failure rates go up with age, no matter how often the drive is used. Yet most users don't back up irreplaceable files or pictures. "You should back up a local copy and take another copy to your grandmother's house, but nobody does that," he says.
Even many businesses whose survival hinges on constant access to data and Internet services don't back up, says Mike Bacher of Tulsa Connect. "A lot of companies, unless something hits them in the face, they won't prepare," he said.
Source: CIO Today