Executive Briefings

Don Schneider, Trucking Pioneer, Dies at 76

Donald (Don) J. Schneider, chairman emeritus and former president and CEO of Schneider National Inc., one of the nation's largest truckload carriers, died Jan. 13, 2012 in De Pere, Wis., following a lengthy and courageous battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was 76.

Schneider was born on October 19, 1935, the year his father sold the family car to buy his first truck, which laid the groundwork for what would become one of the most recognizable transportation and logistics companies in North America.

"The transportation and logistics industry has lost one of its most passionate and influential voices," said Governor Bill Graves, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations. "Don Schneider was a visionary, bringing business acumen and technology to blaze a trail and set the standard in the modern day development of our industry."

Schneider graduated from St. Norbert College with an undergraduate degree in business. After serving a 13-month military tour of duty in Korea, Schneider enrolled in graduate school at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Upon earning his master's degree, he returned to the Green Bay area in 1961 to join his father's trucking company as a manager.

Schneider led the organization bearing his family's name for more than 25 years. During that time, the company grew, survived and thrived during some of the modern trucking industry's greatest challenges, including deregulation in the early 1980s.

His commitment to technological innovation was instrumental to the company's success. Schneider National was the first in the industry to adopt satellite-based communications and positioning in its trucks. His vision extended beyond trucking as Schneider was a pioneer in providing intermodal and logistics services. In 1993 Schneider founded Schneider Logistics as a wholly owned subsidiary of Schneider National.

Schneider retired from the day-to-day responsibilities in 2002. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Pat, five children, 13 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Source: Schneider National

 

Donald (Don) J. Schneider, chairman emeritus and former president and CEO of Schneider National Inc., one of the nation's largest truckload carriers, died Jan. 13, 2012 in De Pere, Wis., following a lengthy and courageous battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was 76.

Schneider was born on October 19, 1935, the year his father sold the family car to buy his first truck, which laid the groundwork for what would become one of the most recognizable transportation and logistics companies in North America.

"The transportation and logistics industry has lost one of its most passionate and influential voices," said Governor Bill Graves, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations. "Don Schneider was a visionary, bringing business acumen and technology to blaze a trail and set the standard in the modern day development of our industry."

Schneider graduated from St. Norbert College with an undergraduate degree in business. After serving a 13-month military tour of duty in Korea, Schneider enrolled in graduate school at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Upon earning his master's degree, he returned to the Green Bay area in 1961 to join his father's trucking company as a manager.

Schneider led the organization bearing his family's name for more than 25 years. During that time, the company grew, survived and thrived during some of the modern trucking industry's greatest challenges, including deregulation in the early 1980s.

His commitment to technological innovation was instrumental to the company's success. Schneider National was the first in the industry to adopt satellite-based communications and positioning in its trucks. His vision extended beyond trucking as Schneider was a pioneer in providing intermodal and logistics services. In 1993 Schneider founded Schneider Logistics as a wholly owned subsidiary of Schneider National.

Schneider retired from the day-to-day responsibilities in 2002. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Pat, five children, 13 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Source: Schneider National