Executive Briefings

Drug Counterfeiting Is Not Just a Third-World Problem

According to Interpol, the return on investment for counterfeiting pharmaceuticals can be over 20 times more than the return on dealing illegal drugs. In addition to making more money, counterfeiters usually face relatively lower penalties if caught.

And technology makes counterfeiting easier than ever: In the past, counterfeiters needed specialized graphics skills, used large printing equipment that was easy to track, and relied on a physical distribution system to sell illicit products. Today, counterfeiters can hide behind the anonymity of desktop imaging and printing equipment, utilize online marketplaces, and distribute products through common carriers like UPS and FedEx, making it much more difficult to track the origin of a counterfeit good. It is no wonder then that trade in counterfeit drugs is on the rise. 
Despite the potential risks associated with counterfeit drugs, consumers in the United States have generally been comforted by the belief that counterfeit pharmaceuticals is largely a third world problem that doesn't affect the U.S. supply chain. Further, many consumers believe that as long as drugs are purchased from a reputable pharmacy there is little to fear. Unfortunately, those assurances just do not ring true anymore.

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Keywords: Pharmaceutical/Bio-Tech, Legal, Govt. & Regulatory Issues, Supply Chain Security & Risk Mgmt, Quality & Metrics, Supply Chain Analysis & Consulting, Global Supply Chain Management, Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals, Origin of Drug Manufacture, Pharmaceutical Pedigree

And technology makes counterfeiting easier than ever: In the past, counterfeiters needed specialized graphics skills, used large printing equipment that was easy to track, and relied on a physical distribution system to sell illicit products. Today, counterfeiters can hide behind the anonymity of desktop imaging and printing equipment, utilize online marketplaces, and distribute products through common carriers like UPS and FedEx, making it much more difficult to track the origin of a counterfeit good. It is no wonder then that trade in counterfeit drugs is on the rise. 
Despite the potential risks associated with counterfeit drugs, consumers in the United States have generally been comforted by the belief that counterfeit pharmaceuticals is largely a third world problem that doesn't affect the U.S. supply chain. Further, many consumers believe that as long as drugs are purchased from a reputable pharmacy there is little to fear. Unfortunately, those assurances just do not ring true anymore.

Read Full Article


Keywords: Pharmaceutical/Bio-Tech, Legal, Govt. & Regulatory Issues, Supply Chain Security & Risk Mgmt, Quality & Metrics, Supply Chain Analysis & Consulting, Global Supply Chain Management, Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals, Origin of Drug Manufacture, Pharmaceutical Pedigree