Executive Briefings

Employers Search to Acquire Skilled Logistics Employees in China

A visit by a Chinese delegation of logistics and education officials reveals that the problems Chinese employers face in filling their logistics jobs are every bit as bad and probably even worse as those experienced by employers in the UK and elsewhere.

Employers Search to Acquire Skilled Logistics Employees in China

On a visit to Unipart Logistics in Birmingham, Haoxiang Ren, vice-president of the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing, said that in China "the skills shortage is for every subject and every position in the sector".

Ren explained there was a fundamental mismatch between the demands of employers and what the Chinese education system is turning out. "Demand is like a pyramid," he said, with many more operative-type jobs at the bottom and relatively few jobs for managers.

Despite this, he said that around 400 universities in China a year provided 100,000 graduates studying logistics as a major part of their degree, leading to a glut of prospective candidates looking to enter the sector at managerial level.

In contrast, only 90,000 graduates with a relevant qualification left 800 secondary vocational colleges (for 15- to 18-year-olds), an insufficient number to fill the far more numerous lower level roles. "It [the education system] doesn't fit the nature of the industry demand," said Ren.

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On a visit to Unipart Logistics in Birmingham, Haoxiang Ren, vice-president of the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing, said that in China "the skills shortage is for every subject and every position in the sector".

Ren explained there was a fundamental mismatch between the demands of employers and what the Chinese education system is turning out. "Demand is like a pyramid," he said, with many more operative-type jobs at the bottom and relatively few jobs for managers.

Despite this, he said that around 400 universities in China a year provided 100,000 graduates studying logistics as a major part of their degree, leading to a glut of prospective candidates looking to enter the sector at managerial level.

In contrast, only 90,000 graduates with a relevant qualification left 800 secondary vocational colleges (for 15- to 18-year-olds), an insufficient number to fill the far more numerous lower level roles. "It [the education system] doesn't fit the nature of the industry demand," said Ren.

Read Full Article

Employers Search to Acquire Skilled Logistics Employees in China