Executive Briefings

Experts Don't Expect to See Strong Privacy Protection for Computer, Technology Users Any Time Soon

Will a strong system for protecting the privacy rights of computer and device users be in place 10 years from now? A sampling of technology experts says probably not. In a new survey by the Pew Research Center, more than half the 2,511 people polled said there will not be a "secure, popularly accepted, and trusted privacy-rights infrastructure" established by 2025.

According to "The Future of Privacy" survey, 55 percent of those polled disagreed that the coming decade would lead to some type of system allowing companies to innovate and make money while also letting people choose how they want their information to be shared.

An anonymous executive at an internet top-level domain name operator said, “Big data equals big business. Those special interests will continue to block any effective public policy work to ensure security, liberty and privacy online.”

The survey reflects increasing concern about how Web users’ information is being used by the sites they visit. At least one respondent predicted that current ideas regarding people’s information will change dramatically over the next decade.

"Society’s definitions of ‘privacy’ and ‘freedom’ will have changed so much by 2025 that today’s meanings will no longer apply," said respondent Nick Arnett, a business intelligence expert

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According to "The Future of Privacy" survey, 55 percent of those polled disagreed that the coming decade would lead to some type of system allowing companies to innovate and make money while also letting people choose how they want their information to be shared.

An anonymous executive at an internet top-level domain name operator said, “Big data equals big business. Those special interests will continue to block any effective public policy work to ensure security, liberty and privacy online.”

The survey reflects increasing concern about how Web users’ information is being used by the sites they visit. At least one respondent predicted that current ideas regarding people’s information will change dramatically over the next decade.

"Society’s definitions of ‘privacy’ and ‘freedom’ will have changed so much by 2025 that today’s meanings will no longer apply," said respondent Nick Arnett, a business intelligence expert

Read Full Article