Executive Briefings

First Hurdle in Supply Chain Environmental Impact Study: Knowing What Questions to Answers

Creating supply chain carbon assessments rests on understanding that the main problem is finding out what the problem actually is. Albert Einstein is quoted as saying that if he had one hour to save the world, he would spend 55 minutes defining the problem and only five minutes finding the solution.

Not fully understanding the questions you're expected to answer is most often the biggest shortcoming in existing supply chain carbon accounting practices. Many organizations are receiving a lot of different requests for information -- from Walmart, U.S. EPA, Carbon Disclosure Project, investors, and state purchasing organizations, just to name a few. As a result, they struggle to define what is necessary and if a complete cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment is required.

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Creating supply chain carbon assessments rests on understanding that the main problem is finding out what the problem actually is. Albert Einstein is quoted as saying that if he had one hour to save the world, he would spend 55 minutes defining the problem and only five minutes finding the solution.

Not fully understanding the questions you're expected to answer is most often the biggest shortcoming in existing supply chain carbon accounting practices. Many organizations are receiving a lot of different requests for information -- from Walmart, U.S. EPA, Carbon Disclosure Project, investors, and state purchasing organizations, just to name a few. As a result, they struggle to define what is necessary and if a complete cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment is required.

Read Full Article