Executive Briefings

Forensic Data Analytics Keeps Tabs on Fraud Committed Internally

According to the EY 2016 Global Forensic Data Analytics Survey, 77 percent of respondents use forensic data analytics to combat internal fraud, which includes travel and entertainment abuse, collusions, and other fraud committed by an insider.

Forensic Data Analytics Keeps Tabs on Fraud Committed Internally

Manufacturing and industrial companies need to protect themselves - not only from increased external cyber attacks, but also from the possibility of rogue employee activities or third parties with access to sensitive internal data - particularly around the supply-chain process. Firms also need to provide the surveillance that regulators are demanding within the parameters of an emerging body of state and national privacy legislations.

The mission-critical nature of information and the ease of digital access make organizations increasingly vulnerable to malicious insiders, who have the potential to wreak financial and reputational havoc. In response, regulators expect organizations to establish robust supervisory procedures that retain and monitor e-communications among employees, vendors, customers, distributors or joint venture partners. To date, many firms have struggled to both keep pace with cyber threats and comply with complex privacy regulation. As a result, the amount of fines levied against firms for surveillance transgressions has increased steadily in recent years.

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Manufacturing and industrial companies need to protect themselves - not only from increased external cyber attacks, but also from the possibility of rogue employee activities or third parties with access to sensitive internal data - particularly around the supply-chain process. Firms also need to provide the surveillance that regulators are demanding within the parameters of an emerging body of state and national privacy legislations.

The mission-critical nature of information and the ease of digital access make organizations increasingly vulnerable to malicious insiders, who have the potential to wreak financial and reputational havoc. In response, regulators expect organizations to establish robust supervisory procedures that retain and monitor e-communications among employees, vendors, customers, distributors or joint venture partners. To date, many firms have struggled to both keep pace with cyber threats and comply with complex privacy regulation. As a result, the amount of fines levied against firms for surveillance transgressions has increased steadily in recent years.

Read Full Article

Forensic Data Analytics Keeps Tabs on Fraud Committed Internally