Executive Briefings

Future for WiMax in the Enterprise Is, Well, Not Now

Despite some hefty investments and even heftier plans among wireless infrastructure providers, serious adoption of WiMax by American businesses is several years away, and even widespread consumer applications are a couple of years off. But that's not stopping everyone from telecommunications firms to automakers to dream about what might be.
WiMax--or as it is rarely called, the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access--is an emerging alternative to WiFi that offers a few key advantages. WiMax transmitters deliver a wireless signal for several miles compared with the 100-to-300-foot range of most Wi-Fi transmitters, and WiMax features superior authentication and encryption schemes to WiFi, making it harder for hackers to spoof the identities of users.
Source: CIO Insight, http://www.cioinsight.com/c/a/Strategy/WiMax-Obstacles-to-Enterprise-Adoption/

Despite some hefty investments and even heftier plans among wireless infrastructure providers, serious adoption of WiMax by American businesses is several years away, and even widespread consumer applications are a couple of years off. But that's not stopping everyone from telecommunications firms to automakers to dream about what might be.
WiMax--or as it is rarely called, the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access--is an emerging alternative to WiFi that offers a few key advantages. WiMax transmitters deliver a wireless signal for several miles compared with the 100-to-300-foot range of most Wi-Fi transmitters, and WiMax features superior authentication and encryption schemes to WiFi, making it harder for hackers to spoof the identities of users.
Source: CIO Insight, http://www.cioinsight.com/c/a/Strategy/WiMax-Obstacles-to-Enterprise-Adoption/