Executive Briefings

GlaxoSmithKline Denies Report, Says It Remains Interested in RFID

Despite a recent media report that GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) was thinking of forsaking radio frequency identification technology, the drug manufacturer says it remains committed to exploring how RFID can be used to improve the visibility of pharmaceutical products in the supply chain, and to curb drug counterfeiting and theft.
"RFID remains in place," says GSK spokesperson Mary Ann Rhyne. "In fact, we've extended the RFID testing, and no cut-off time has been determined." The news article, in a U.K.-based newspaper and on its web site, had suggested that by year's end, GSK might abandon its efforts to test RFID tags on individual bottles of products considered at risk for counterfeiting, because the project has been fraught with technical difficulties.
Source: RFID Journal, http://www.rfidjournal.com

Despite a recent media report that GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) was thinking of forsaking radio frequency identification technology, the drug manufacturer says it remains committed to exploring how RFID can be used to improve the visibility of pharmaceutical products in the supply chain, and to curb drug counterfeiting and theft.
"RFID remains in place," says GSK spokesperson Mary Ann Rhyne. "In fact, we've extended the RFID testing, and no cut-off time has been determined." The news article, in a U.K.-based newspaper and on its web site, had suggested that by year's end, GSK might abandon its efforts to test RFID tags on individual bottles of products considered at risk for counterfeiting, because the project has been fraught with technical difficulties.
Source: RFID Journal, http://www.rfidjournal.com