Executive Briefings

Going Green With Sales Carbon Operations Planning

"Sales Carbon Operations Planning" (SCOP) offers a new take on supply-chain management, bringing together traditional sales and operations planning (S&OP) techniques and the need for companies to track and reduce their carbon emissions. "It's my way of making it easy to transfer into sustainability with your existing processes," says Silvia Leahu-Aluas, owner of Sustainable Manufacturing Consulting. The new term covers everything from basic carbon dioxide management to a full understanding of the economic and environmental impact of greenhouse gas emissions.

As a established, systematic means of managing across corporate functions, S&OP offers "an easy conduit for bringing in sustainability," says Leahu-Aluas. The introduction of carbon management, however, forces companies to broaden their view of the systems and processes that impact the ecosystem.

A good place to start, according to Leahu-Aluas, is the area of cost. S&OP is already geared toward reducing corporate expense, especially on the supply side. Companies can broaden their view of suppliers by adding carbon emissions to the metric of material costs. On the demand side, the design of "green" products can open up new avenues of revenue throughout an item's lifecycle. "That's an easy entry for sustainability," she says.

Cost and sustainability don't always mesh; a decision to pursue the latter can be more expensive up front. In such cases, Leahu-Aluas says, companies need to take the long view. "The majority is talking about sustainability as the next major wave of development, and a way of exiting this crisis," she notes. "I don't think we'll fall back to producing under the economic model of the last 30 years." On the contrary, SCOP could create a new model for sustainable manufacturing in the U.S.

SCOP also touches on the critical issue of managing supply-chain risk. In fact, says Leahu-Aluas, "I see it as a perfect link." Companies with a good SCOP process, especially on the environmental side,  are already engaging in good risk management.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: Environmental, Global Supply Chain Management, Supply Chain Analysis & Consulting, Quality & Metrics, Supply Chain Security & Risk Mgmt, Legal, Govt. & Regulatory Issues, Business Strategy Alignment, Asset Management, Business Intelligence & Analytics, Business Process Management, Collaboration & Integration, Event Management, Global Trade Management, Network Design, Product Lifecycle Management, Sales & Operations Planning, Supplier Relationship Management, SC Finance & Revenue Mgmt., SC Planning & Optimization, Supply Chain Visibility, Carbon Management, Sustainable Manufacturing

As a established, systematic means of managing across corporate functions, S&OP offers "an easy conduit for bringing in sustainability," says Leahu-Aluas. The introduction of carbon management, however, forces companies to broaden their view of the systems and processes that impact the ecosystem.

A good place to start, according to Leahu-Aluas, is the area of cost. S&OP is already geared toward reducing corporate expense, especially on the supply side. Companies can broaden their view of suppliers by adding carbon emissions to the metric of material costs. On the demand side, the design of "green" products can open up new avenues of revenue throughout an item's lifecycle. "That's an easy entry for sustainability," she says.

Cost and sustainability don't always mesh; a decision to pursue the latter can be more expensive up front. In such cases, Leahu-Aluas says, companies need to take the long view. "The majority is talking about sustainability as the next major wave of development, and a way of exiting this crisis," she notes. "I don't think we'll fall back to producing under the economic model of the last 30 years." On the contrary, SCOP could create a new model for sustainable manufacturing in the U.S.

SCOP also touches on the critical issue of managing supply-chain risk. In fact, says Leahu-Aluas, "I see it as a perfect link." Companies with a good SCOP process, especially on the environmental side,  are already engaging in good risk management.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: Environmental, Global Supply Chain Management, Supply Chain Analysis & Consulting, Quality & Metrics, Supply Chain Security & Risk Mgmt, Legal, Govt. & Regulatory Issues, Business Strategy Alignment, Asset Management, Business Intelligence & Analytics, Business Process Management, Collaboration & Integration, Event Management, Global Trade Management, Network Design, Product Lifecycle Management, Sales & Operations Planning, Supplier Relationship Management, SC Finance & Revenue Mgmt., SC Planning & Optimization, Supply Chain Visibility, Carbon Management, Sustainable Manufacturing