Executive Briefings

Hey, I'm Ready. My Disaster Plan Is in ... Somebody's Office … Somewhere … I Think.

Some might claim success because they have a plan in a binder on the shelf, or they've checked all the boxes to comply with good business continuity management standards. Often these efforts simply bolster a thinly veiled attitude of complacency. To achieve true resiliency in today's interdependent and continuously changing world, traditional continuity planning needs to be re-engineered or "blown up."

Managing resiliency today is as much about avoiding or minimizing exposure to risk as it is expediting recovery or adjusting to events. Over the last several years, many organizations have focused on optimizing efficiency but not resiliency, which was completed as a separate and disconnected effort. Concurrently optimizing resiliency and efficiency requires discipline, analytics, decision modeling, and the involvement of a broad cross-section of business, technology, and operation leaders both inside and outside the organization.

Where to begin? The initial step should involve changing a basic assumption: things are so improbable that they can't happen to your company.

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Some might claim success because they have a plan in a binder on the shelf, or they've checked all the boxes to comply with good business continuity management standards. Often these efforts simply bolster a thinly veiled attitude of complacency. To achieve true resiliency in today's interdependent and continuously changing world, traditional continuity planning needs to be re-engineered or "blown up."

Managing resiliency today is as much about avoiding or minimizing exposure to risk as it is expediting recovery or adjusting to events. Over the last several years, many organizations have focused on optimizing efficiency but not resiliency, which was completed as a separate and disconnected effort. Concurrently optimizing resiliency and efficiency requires discipline, analytics, decision modeling, and the involvement of a broad cross-section of business, technology, and operation leaders both inside and outside the organization.

Where to begin? The initial step should involve changing a basic assumption: things are so improbable that they can't happen to your company.

Read Full Article