Executive Briefings

High-Tech Parts Maker Uses RFID to Track Multiple Orders

At its shop in Fremont, Calif., the Electrofusion division of Brush Wellman makes a wide range of small, high-value parts, such as beryllium foil used in X-ray machines and acoustic speaker domes. The factory keeps its eight engineers busy, each managing up to 25 simultaneous projects. But a newly deployed RFID system has greatly eased the strain of trying to keep multiple orders on track and completed on time, according to the facility's director, Edward Hefter.
He explains that before his shop deployed the RFID system, trying to keep track of multiple projects was like watching a skyful of airplanes, each moving in a different direction, with no clue where they were headed or when they would arrive. Now, he says it feels more like watching an air traffic controller's computer screen, with details about the routes all the planes are taking.
Source: RFID Journal, http://www.rfidjournal.com

At its shop in Fremont, Calif., the Electrofusion division of Brush Wellman makes a wide range of small, high-value parts, such as beryllium foil used in X-ray machines and acoustic speaker domes. The factory keeps its eight engineers busy, each managing up to 25 simultaneous projects. But a newly deployed RFID system has greatly eased the strain of trying to keep multiple orders on track and completed on time, according to the facility's director, Edward Hefter.
He explains that before his shop deployed the RFID system, trying to keep track of multiple projects was like watching a skyful of airplanes, each moving in a different direction, with no clue where they were headed or when they would arrive. Now, he says it feels more like watching an air traffic controller's computer screen, with details about the routes all the planes are taking.
Source: RFID Journal, http://www.rfidjournal.com