Executive Briefings

Holiday Season Hiring: More Companies Show Need for Human Touch

If robots are taking human jobs, they haven't made much headway in Santa's workshop - or in his supply chain. It turns out that even the most technologically advanced retailers need lots of humans to serve customers. Amazon, arguably the most disruptive force in American retailing, announced last week that it would be hiring 120,000 seasonal workers this year - 20 percent more than last year - and the Seattle giant isn't alone.

Every year, there is massive seasonal hiring: at logistics companies, big box retailers, e-tailers. UPS is hiring 95,000, or 2,000 more than last year. Target will bring in 70,000, and Kohl’s will add 69,000.

Skeptics will note that these are temporary jobs, not full-time ones, and that several weeks of work in a warehouse or a mall is no substitute for the full-time, secure payroll jobs with benefits that most people crave. But for those without jobs, or for those who want to earn extra money, several weeks of work may be better than nothing. And on aggregate, the hiring adds up to billions of dollars in wages - and hence taxes, rent and mortgage payments and consumption.

What’s more, a chunk of these temporary jobs have a habit of turning into permanent ones, especially at companies that are enjoying solid growth. Amazon noted that last year, more than 14,000 of the 100,000 seasonal workers it hired became full-time employees, and more should do so this year.

Read Full Article

Every year, there is massive seasonal hiring: at logistics companies, big box retailers, e-tailers. UPS is hiring 95,000, or 2,000 more than last year. Target will bring in 70,000, and Kohl’s will add 69,000.

Skeptics will note that these are temporary jobs, not full-time ones, and that several weeks of work in a warehouse or a mall is no substitute for the full-time, secure payroll jobs with benefits that most people crave. But for those without jobs, or for those who want to earn extra money, several weeks of work may be better than nothing. And on aggregate, the hiring adds up to billions of dollars in wages - and hence taxes, rent and mortgage payments and consumption.

What’s more, a chunk of these temporary jobs have a habit of turning into permanent ones, especially at companies that are enjoying solid growth. Amazon noted that last year, more than 14,000 of the 100,000 seasonal workers it hired became full-time employees, and more should do so this year.

Read Full Article