Executive Briefings

House Bill Seeks to Levy Taxes on Online-only Retail Merchants

House Oversight Chairman Jason Chaffetz has introduced the Remote Transaction Parity Act (RTPA), legislation that would require all retailers that sell products in their state, even those who sell exclusively online, to collect the same sales tax.

House Bill Seeks to Levy Taxes on Online-only Retail Merchants

Despite Senate passage of the Marketplace Fairness Act in 2013 on a strong bipartisan vote, the House did not vote on a similar proposal. Introduction of RTPA in the House should reignite the debate in Washington, and retailers are hopeful that lawmakers will find a consensus solution that can be voted on this year in both chambers. Jennifer Safavian, RILA executive vice president for government affairs, issued the following statement:  

“Main Street retailers have long maintained that requiring some businesses to collect taxes while giving others a free pass amounts to little more than a government subsidy. Online sellers no longer need special treatment - it’s time for Congress to close the online loophole and restore basic free market competition for retailers across the country. 

“Retailers aren’t asking for handouts or carve outs from Congress, we just want everyone to play by the same rules.  We’re open to any solution that provides clarity and fairness for both retailers and consumers - and that means no consumer should be paying a tax rate where they don’t live and vote. 

“We look forward to continuing to work with Chairman Goodlatte, Senate supporters and lead sponsors of RTPA in the House on a final product that restores free market competition for all retailers in 2015.”

Source: RILA

 

Despite Senate passage of the Marketplace Fairness Act in 2013 on a strong bipartisan vote, the House did not vote on a similar proposal. Introduction of RTPA in the House should reignite the debate in Washington, and retailers are hopeful that lawmakers will find a consensus solution that can be voted on this year in both chambers. Jennifer Safavian, RILA executive vice president for government affairs, issued the following statement:  

“Main Street retailers have long maintained that requiring some businesses to collect taxes while giving others a free pass amounts to little more than a government subsidy. Online sellers no longer need special treatment - it’s time for Congress to close the online loophole and restore basic free market competition for retailers across the country. 

“Retailers aren’t asking for handouts or carve outs from Congress, we just want everyone to play by the same rules.  We’re open to any solution that provides clarity and fairness for both retailers and consumers - and that means no consumer should be paying a tax rate where they don’t live and vote. 

“We look forward to continuing to work with Chairman Goodlatte, Senate supporters and lead sponsors of RTPA in the House on a final product that restores free market competition for all retailers in 2015.”

Source: RILA

 

House Bill Seeks to Levy Taxes on Online-only Retail Merchants