Executive Briefings

How CSX Is Meeting the Demands of Intermodal Shippers

Arthur Adams Jr., director of sales with CSX, outlines shippers' intermodal "pain points," and talks about what the railroad is doing to alleviate them.

The first and foremost "pain point"experienced by shippers today is the challenge of scaling surface-transportation capacity in line with a company's growth demands, Adams said. Second is the need of shippers to incorporate cost savings into their sustainability efforts. Such concerns have prompted CSXT Intermodal to push for the conversion of truck freight to rail.

The transportation landscape continues to evolve, Adams said, adding that flexibility is the key to the success of any logistics network. Intermodal capacity helps shippers to ramp up capacity when needed. Stack-train economics can also help to generate cost savings. Fifty-three-foot-long domestic trailers can carry more freight than 40-foot ocean containers, reducing the cost per unit through the use of intermodal service.

In the past, many rail systems have been unable to accommodate double-stack trains because of low bridge and tunnel clearances, especially in the eastern U.S. Adams said that challenge is being met, as railroads invest in the expansion of their physical infrastructure. Also of crucial importance, he said, is the efficiency of first and last-mile transportation for the intermodal shipper.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: supply chain, supply chain management, intermodal transportation, rail freight transportation, logistics management, logistics services, transportation management

The first and foremost "pain point"experienced by shippers today is the challenge of scaling surface-transportation capacity in line with a company's growth demands, Adams said. Second is the need of shippers to incorporate cost savings into their sustainability efforts. Such concerns have prompted CSXT Intermodal to push for the conversion of truck freight to rail.

The transportation landscape continues to evolve, Adams said, adding that flexibility is the key to the success of any logistics network. Intermodal capacity helps shippers to ramp up capacity when needed. Stack-train economics can also help to generate cost savings. Fifty-three-foot-long domestic trailers can carry more freight than 40-foot ocean containers, reducing the cost per unit through the use of intermodal service.

In the past, many rail systems have been unable to accommodate double-stack trains because of low bridge and tunnel clearances, especially in the eastern U.S. Adams said that challenge is being met, as railroads invest in the expansion of their physical infrastructure. Also of crucial importance, he said, is the efficiency of first and last-mile transportation for the intermodal shipper.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: supply chain, supply chain management, intermodal transportation, rail freight transportation, logistics management, logistics services, transportation management