Executive Briefings

How IT Makes Aerospace-Defense Supply Chains Work Efficiently

The aerospace and defense supply chain is under pressure. According to FinancialTimes.com, in 2020, Boeing and Airbus are expected to deliver more than 1,800 passenger jets, a 45 percent increase over 2013.

That means all of the thousands of companies that manufacture seats and dashboards and carbon fiber and rubber and paint and wheels have to work faster. But throwing money at the problem is not a viable approach. When customers step up their demand, they expect volume prices.

Delivering more with less? Let's think about who in the executive suite has experience with that … Enter the CIO, who has been increasing capacity while reducing costs for years. Ken Bell, CIO of Orbital ATK, which designs and manufactures satellites and launch vehicles, propulsion systems, tactical missiles, defense electronics and ammunition, sees four areas in which IT greases the wheels of the aerospace-and-defense supply chain.

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That means all of the thousands of companies that manufacture seats and dashboards and carbon fiber and rubber and paint and wheels have to work faster. But throwing money at the problem is not a viable approach. When customers step up their demand, they expect volume prices.

Delivering more with less? Let's think about who in the executive suite has experience with that … Enter the CIO, who has been increasing capacity while reducing costs for years. Ken Bell, CIO of Orbital ATK, which designs and manufactures satellites and launch vehicles, propulsion systems, tactical missiles, defense electronics and ammunition, sees four areas in which IT greases the wheels of the aerospace-and-defense supply chain.

Read Full Article