Executive Briefings

Irony of Ironies, Chinese Telecom Equipment Company Is Pushing Global Cybersecurity Standards

Huawei, the Chinese telecom equipment maker that has been blocked from the U.S. market because of concerns about its alleged ties to China's government, is now pushing for global cybersecurity standards.

The company has tried, unsuccessfully, to bid for several contracts in the U.S. But it's been shut out of the market because of government worries that letting it provide building blocks for key infrastructure would leave American networks susceptible to cyber-espionage. In response, Huawei has embarked on an immense lobbying and PR campaign that aims to prove its products don't pose a threat to U.S. networks. It has tried to make nice with corporate America by committing to shelling out more than $6bn on processors and other components from Broadcom, Qualcomm and other local companies. It has attempted to win the public's trust by showing more transparency from its leadership. Now, in an effort to recast its image, it is also pushing for international players to collaborate on a set of security standards. The chief security officer for Huawei's U.S. operations, Andy Purdy, says, "It may seem counterintuitive, but I joined [the company] to help make global infrastructure more secure."

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The company has tried, unsuccessfully, to bid for several contracts in the U.S. But it's been shut out of the market because of government worries that letting it provide building blocks for key infrastructure would leave American networks susceptible to cyber-espionage. In response, Huawei has embarked on an immense lobbying and PR campaign that aims to prove its products don't pose a threat to U.S. networks. It has tried to make nice with corporate America by committing to shelling out more than $6bn on processors and other components from Broadcom, Qualcomm and other local companies. It has attempted to win the public's trust by showing more transparency from its leadership. Now, in an effort to recast its image, it is also pushing for international players to collaborate on a set of security standards. The chief security officer for Huawei's U.S. operations, Andy Purdy, says, "It may seem counterintuitive, but I joined [the company] to help make global infrastructure more secure."

Read Full Article