Executive Briefings

Is 'Warped Geography Syndrome' Affecting Your Omnichannel Delivery Strategy?

New York City is clearly not in Wyoming. But you would never realize it based on the omnichannel strategies that you see in many organizations today.

Even though Brooklyn and Jackson Hole do not share zip codes, flora or fauna, companies are making the same service promises to all customers - independent of where they live.

But guess what? Just as common sense tells us there is a difference between New York City and Wyoming, there is a difference in customer expectations from region to region.

The people who live in New York City believe same-day delivery is great customer service, and that's what they expect. Likewise, people who live in Wyoming tend to believe that two-day delivery is great customer service, and they do not expect same-day delivery, or even next-day delivery.

Same-day is defined by some as the time "from sun up to sun down." However, this definition is not realistic due to how people order products today, as well as how the process from order-to-delivery works.

Perhaps a better definition of same-day delivery is to execute final delivery to the customer within 24 hours. If a customer places an order by a cutoff time of 5:00 p.m., and then it reaches a customer by 5:00 p.m. the next day, then delivery is considered "same-day."

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Keywords: transportation management, supply chain management, logistics services, logistics & supply chain, value chain, retail supply chain

Even though Brooklyn and Jackson Hole do not share zip codes, flora or fauna, companies are making the same service promises to all customers - independent of where they live.

But guess what? Just as common sense tells us there is a difference between New York City and Wyoming, there is a difference in customer expectations from region to region.

The people who live in New York City believe same-day delivery is great customer service, and that's what they expect. Likewise, people who live in Wyoming tend to believe that two-day delivery is great customer service, and they do not expect same-day delivery, or even next-day delivery.

Same-day is defined by some as the time "from sun up to sun down." However, this definition is not realistic due to how people order products today, as well as how the process from order-to-delivery works.

Perhaps a better definition of same-day delivery is to execute final delivery to the customer within 24 hours. If a customer places an order by a cutoff time of 5:00 p.m., and then it reaches a customer by 5:00 p.m. the next day, then delivery is considered "same-day."

Read Full Article


Keywords: transportation management, supply chain management, logistics services, logistics & supply chain, value chain, retail supply chain