Executive Briefings

Metals Industry Unsure How to Identify Carbon Output

Widespread concerns about greenhouse gases and global warming have led to myriad regulations regarding carbon emissions, once the domain of scientists and environmental crusaders. As a result, metals companies--and other manufacturers--will soon be required to track and report on their carbon emissions. Europe has been the most aggressive in requiring businesses to track their carbon output, but the United States took its first significant steps this summer with the Low Carbon Economy Act of 2007, introduced by Sens. Jeff Bingaman, D-NM, and Arlen Specter, R-PA. The bill proposes limits on carbon emissions and sets the stage for a cap-and-trade system, modeled after Europe's, where companies can buy and sell carbon emissions credits on the open market. Although still a long way from ratification, the bill would likely mandate that companies track and report on their carbon emissions as well as execute credit transactions with other manufacturers. The problem is that most U.S. steel and metals makers don't have a clear picture of their carbon output.
Source: Managing Automation, http://www.managingautomation.com

Widespread concerns about greenhouse gases and global warming have led to myriad regulations regarding carbon emissions, once the domain of scientists and environmental crusaders. As a result, metals companies--and other manufacturers--will soon be required to track and report on their carbon emissions. Europe has been the most aggressive in requiring businesses to track their carbon output, but the United States took its first significant steps this summer with the Low Carbon Economy Act of 2007, introduced by Sens. Jeff Bingaman, D-NM, and Arlen Specter, R-PA. The bill proposes limits on carbon emissions and sets the stage for a cap-and-trade system, modeled after Europe's, where companies can buy and sell carbon emissions credits on the open market. Although still a long way from ratification, the bill would likely mandate that companies track and report on their carbon emissions as well as execute credit transactions with other manufacturers. The problem is that most U.S. steel and metals makers don't have a clear picture of their carbon output.
Source: Managing Automation, http://www.managingautomation.com