Executive Briefings

More Retailers Come Clean on Where Their Products Come From

Some retailers are doing what was once unthinkable, handing over information about exactly how, and where, their products were made.

More Retailers Come Clean on Where Their Products Come From

Everlane, an online boutique, recently added paragraphs to its Web site describing the factories where its products are made.

Nordstrom says it is considering adding information about clothes produced in humane working conditions.

An online boutique breaks down the number of workers involved in making each item and the cost of every component, while a textiles company intends to trumpet the fair-trade origins of its robes when Bed Bath & Beyond starts selling them this month.

And a group of major retailers and apparel companies, including some "” like Nike and Walmart "” with a history of controversial manufacturing practices overseas, says it is developing an index that will include labor, social and environmental measures.

New research indicates a growing consumer demand for information about how and where goods are produced. A study last year by professors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard showed that some consumers "” even those who were focused on discount prices "” were not only willing to pay more, but actually did pay more, for clothes that carried signs about fair-labor practices.

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Everlane, an online boutique, recently added paragraphs to its Web site describing the factories where its products are made.

Nordstrom says it is considering adding information about clothes produced in humane working conditions.

An online boutique breaks down the number of workers involved in making each item and the cost of every component, while a textiles company intends to trumpet the fair-trade origins of its robes when Bed Bath & Beyond starts selling them this month.

And a group of major retailers and apparel companies, including some "” like Nike and Walmart "” with a history of controversial manufacturing practices overseas, says it is developing an index that will include labor, social and environmental measures.

New research indicates a growing consumer demand for information about how and where goods are produced. A study last year by professors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard showed that some consumers "” even those who were focused on discount prices "” were not only willing to pay more, but actually did pay more, for clothes that carried signs about fair-labor practices.

Read Full Article

More Retailers Come Clean on Where Their Products Come From