Executive Briefings

New Book Argues that Supply Chains Require Common Sense, Advanced Technology to Survive

Most companies are ill-equipped, ill-prepared and ill-situated to effectively compete in the global marketplace of the 21st Century. So says Michael J. Stolarczyk, president of Kontane Logistics, in his book, Logical Logistics: A Common Sense Primer for Your Supply Chain.

"The globalization of commerce has made sophisticated logistics technology a necessity for companies large and small," he writes. "The need for advanced solutions may seem obvious, but a surprising number of companies still have a long way to go when it comes to global supply chain technology sophistication. Many Fortune 500 companies report their global supply chain technology is inadequate to provide timely information required for budget and cash flow planning. Indeed, the global supply chain has been relatively ignored because it was traditionally a small part of a organization's business mindset. The themes of this book are: insight, foresight, and guidance from a common sense perspective on supply chain and logistics challenges in today's brave new world. We have moved into a conceptual age of business, when logical logistics understanding and decisions need to be made via vested collaboration and open dialogue with internal and external partners." Stolarczyk claims that advanced logistics technology is vital for the survival of any company, regardless of its size or the territory it serves. Many companies are out of date, and ultimately, out of touch with today's technology and its benefit on the current business model.

"I want folks that are in major organizations and Fortune 500 companies to understand that supply chain and logistics decisions can be made in a common sense way," he says. "This means an open dialogue with stakeholders, both internal and external to their company. My book is not 'Supply Chain for Dummies,' but it is an ideal source for strategic guidance and inspiration."

The book, which includes a glossary and terms section, is available online at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Most companies are ill-equipped, ill-prepared and ill-situated to effectively compete in the global marketplace of the 21st Century. So says Michael J. Stolarczyk, president of Kontane Logistics, in his book, Logical Logistics: A Common Sense Primer for Your Supply Chain.

"The globalization of commerce has made sophisticated logistics technology a necessity for companies large and small," he writes. "The need for advanced solutions may seem obvious, but a surprising number of companies still have a long way to go when it comes to global supply chain technology sophistication. Many Fortune 500 companies report their global supply chain technology is inadequate to provide timely information required for budget and cash flow planning. Indeed, the global supply chain has been relatively ignored because it was traditionally a small part of a organization's business mindset. The themes of this book are: insight, foresight, and guidance from a common sense perspective on supply chain and logistics challenges in today's brave new world. We have moved into a conceptual age of business, when logical logistics understanding and decisions need to be made via vested collaboration and open dialogue with internal and external partners." Stolarczyk claims that advanced logistics technology is vital for the survival of any company, regardless of its size or the territory it serves. Many companies are out of date, and ultimately, out of touch with today's technology and its benefit on the current business model.

"I want folks that are in major organizations and Fortune 500 companies to understand that supply chain and logistics decisions can be made in a common sense way," he says. "This means an open dialogue with stakeholders, both internal and external to their company. My book is not 'Supply Chain for Dummies,' but it is an ideal source for strategic guidance and inspiration."

The book, which includes a glossary and terms section, is available online at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.