Executive Briefings

Nike Overhauls Human-Capital Supply Chain

On any given day, Nike Inc. has more than 3,000 temporary workers supporting its operations--a human-capital supply chain that is critical to its day-to-day business. However, Daniel Hanyzewski, Nike's staffing director for global functions, saw a kink in that supply chain that needed attention. Hanyzewski's staffing group, with the help of Nike's procurement organization, embarked on a major overhaul of the company's global staffing processes, resulting in a managed staffing program that he believes will become an industry benchmark in the future.
Prior to the new program, Hanyzewski estimates that Nike, which designs, markets and distributes athletic footwear, apparel, equipment and accessories for a variety of sports and fitness activities, spent more than $110m a year on contract labor globally. He says the system for hiring contract labor was "very scattered and disparate." It was clear, he says, that Nike was not leveraging its buying power when it came to contract labor, which includes temporary workers hired to fill a void or to assist during a spike in business activity.
Source: Inside Supply Management, http://www.ism.ws

On any given day, Nike Inc. has more than 3,000 temporary workers supporting its operations--a human-capital supply chain that is critical to its day-to-day business. However, Daniel Hanyzewski, Nike's staffing director for global functions, saw a kink in that supply chain that needed attention. Hanyzewski's staffing group, with the help of Nike's procurement organization, embarked on a major overhaul of the company's global staffing processes, resulting in a managed staffing program that he believes will become an industry benchmark in the future.
Prior to the new program, Hanyzewski estimates that Nike, which designs, markets and distributes athletic footwear, apparel, equipment and accessories for a variety of sports and fitness activities, spent more than $110m a year on contract labor globally. He says the system for hiring contract labor was "very scattered and disparate." It was clear, he says, that Nike was not leveraging its buying power when it came to contract labor, which includes temporary workers hired to fill a void or to assist during a spike in business activity.
Source: Inside Supply Management, http://www.ism.ws