Executive Briefings

On-Time ERP Rollouts Have Dismal Success Record. Why Bother?

ERP software implementations can be painful--crazy expensive for the business, enormously complex for IT grunts, and annoying to change-averse users. Some see ERP as a necessary evil that enables 21st century companies to achieve competitive similarity with one another.
At best, these grueling ERP rollouts deliver a back-office system that will bore any sane person to tears. At worst, they can be costly and embarrassing corporate blunders that leave board members or shareholders asking: "What the hell happened to that IT project?"
Your chances of ERP success? Not good. Today's ERP rollout has only a 7 percent chance of coming in on time, will probably cost more than what you estimated, and will likely deliver very unsatisfying results.
Source: CIO

ERP software implementations can be painful--crazy expensive for the business, enormously complex for IT grunts, and annoying to change-averse users. Some see ERP as a necessary evil that enables 21st century companies to achieve competitive similarity with one another.
At best, these grueling ERP rollouts deliver a back-office system that will bore any sane person to tears. At worst, they can be costly and embarrassing corporate blunders that leave board members or shareholders asking: "What the hell happened to that IT project?"
Your chances of ERP success? Not good. Today's ERP rollout has only a 7 percent chance of coming in on time, will probably cost more than what you estimated, and will likely deliver very unsatisfying results.
Source: CIO