Executive Briefings

Open Innovation - Relying on Outsiders - Doesn't Seem to Come Naturally

It seems that many companies converted to open innovation-relying on outsiders for their next products or services-only after falling into a crisis. Moreover, the panic struck most of them around the time of the previous recession in 2001, which suggests that we should start seeing many more open-innovation practitioners soon.

Among those that found religion a decade ago are Johnson & Johnson, Procter & Gamble and Whirlpool. Others which came to open innovation more recently after moments of doubt are Rockwell Collins and the consumer-products unit of GlaxoSmithkline. As Cheryl Perkins, former chief innovation officer at Kimberly-Clark and now president of her own consultancy, Innovationedge, says: "Often open innovation starts with a burning platform."

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It seems that many companies converted to open innovation-relying on outsiders for their next products or services-only after falling into a crisis. Moreover, the panic struck most of them around the time of the previous recession in 2001, which suggests that we should start seeing many more open-innovation practitioners soon.

Among those that found religion a decade ago are Johnson & Johnson, Procter & Gamble and Whirlpool. Others which came to open innovation more recently after moments of doubt are Rockwell Collins and the consumer-products unit of GlaxoSmithkline. As Cheryl Perkins, former chief innovation officer at Kimberly-Clark and now president of her own consultancy, Innovationedge, says: "Often open innovation starts with a burning platform."

Read Full Article