Executive Briefings

Orbis Unveils BulkTote Service With Four-Way Fork Truck Entry

Orbis Corp., a maker of sustainable and reusable packaging, has introduced the BulkTote, offering fork-truck entry on all sides for easier handling and line-side part delivery.

According to the company, the offering will allow companies to double the number of SKUs they can load while reducing line-side space by nearly half. Traditionally, Orbis said, the internal capacity of handheld and collapsible bulk containers had a tendency to be underutilized when holding heavy, dense parts, due to high weight loads or slower-turning SKUs. Totes would need to be palletized and moved with a forklift, and would be difficult to manage. Meanwhile, heavy or dense parts such as metal stampings and gears would underutilize the larger, heavy-duty bulk containers. Designed to hold up to 500 pounds, and weighing less than 30 pounds when empty, the BulkTote replaces wire baskets, steel tubs or wood and corrugated packaging with a fully reusable alternative. It is made of structural foam molded in high-density polyethylene, and can be fully recycled at the end of its life.

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According to the company, the offering will allow companies to double the number of SKUs they can load while reducing line-side space by nearly half. Traditionally, Orbis said, the internal capacity of handheld and collapsible bulk containers had a tendency to be underutilized when holding heavy, dense parts, due to high weight loads or slower-turning SKUs. Totes would need to be palletized and moved with a forklift, and would be difficult to manage. Meanwhile, heavy or dense parts such as metal stampings and gears would underutilize the larger, heavy-duty bulk containers. Designed to hold up to 500 pounds, and weighing less than 30 pounds when empty, the BulkTote replaces wire baskets, steel tubs or wood and corrugated packaging with a fully reusable alternative. It is made of structural foam molded in high-density polyethylene, and can be fully recycled at the end of its life.

Read Full Article