Executive Briefings

Our Software's Great--But Nobody Knows How to Use It

Sometimes in shifting to new systems as a result of an acquisition or merger, companies don't always have time to bring their users up to speed on how to make the most of the new software.
Case in point: Dade Behring Holdings, the world's largest company dedicated exclusively to clinical diagnostics. In 1996, Dade Behring (then called Dade International) purchased DuPont's diagnostic business with an eye to expanding its leadership in clinical chemistry.
That same year, the company began switching from a DuPont-developed system to an SAP Flexible Planning Module. Unfortunately, once it got off the DuPont system, Dade Behring, which offers a range of products, services and systems designed to meet the needs of medical labs, discovered there were problems in getting users to adjust to the new software. "We had our first experience with training in using the SAP module," says Bill Magagna, global instructional system design lead for Dade Behring.
The implementation was hardly a success. In fact, because it couldn't get its users up to speed on the SAP system, Dade Behring for eight months was unable to update forecasts on the system, according to an article by John Dougherty, a senior partner at manufacturing and educational consultancy Partners for Excellence who did consulting work for Dade Behring. New forecasts had to be generated manually.
Fortunately, Dade Behring managed to surmount this obstacle.
Source: CIO Insight, http://www.cioinsight.com

Sometimes in shifting to new systems as a result of an acquisition or merger, companies don't always have time to bring their users up to speed on how to make the most of the new software.
Case in point: Dade Behring Holdings, the world's largest company dedicated exclusively to clinical diagnostics. In 1996, Dade Behring (then called Dade International) purchased DuPont's diagnostic business with an eye to expanding its leadership in clinical chemistry.
That same year, the company began switching from a DuPont-developed system to an SAP Flexible Planning Module. Unfortunately, once it got off the DuPont system, Dade Behring, which offers a range of products, services and systems designed to meet the needs of medical labs, discovered there were problems in getting users to adjust to the new software. "We had our first experience with training in using the SAP module," says Bill Magagna, global instructional system design lead for Dade Behring.
The implementation was hardly a success. In fact, because it couldn't get its users up to speed on the SAP system, Dade Behring for eight months was unable to update forecasts on the system, according to an article by John Dougherty, a senior partner at manufacturing and educational consultancy Partners for Excellence who did consulting work for Dade Behring. New forecasts had to be generated manually.
Fortunately, Dade Behring managed to surmount this obstacle.
Source: CIO Insight, http://www.cioinsight.com