Executive Briefings

People Favor Mobile Payments - for Others, Poll Finds. They Want to Keep Their Cards and Cash.

If you're looking for more evidence of the bipolar nature of mobile shoppers, look no further. The Harris Poll people have what you need. In what should be called the NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) effect, some 66 percent of Americans polled said they expect mobile payments to eventually replace payment cards and even cash-but not their cards and cash.

When asked if they personally want to use mobile as a payment device, the overwhelmingly strongest answer"”across literally every demographic group sampled"”was the single answer of "not very or not at all interested."

That's a wonderful statistical illustration of today's challenge for mobile payment: A lot of people think it's a great idea, but they personally have no interest in doing it. It's great, though, they believe, for everybody else.

When Harris asked these questions of a demographically representative group of 2,383 adults Nov. 14-19, they probed into why this group didn't want to personally try mobile payment. The top answer, which speaks to the lack of incentives or discounts offered to shoppers to try mobile payments: "Don't see any reason to switch from cash or payment cards." That was followed closely by "Don't want to store sensitive information on my phone" and the always popular "I don't use a smartphone." All of those answers were selected by 50 percent to 52 percent of those polled.

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When asked if they personally want to use mobile as a payment device, the overwhelmingly strongest answer"”across literally every demographic group sampled"”was the single answer of "not very or not at all interested."

That's a wonderful statistical illustration of today's challenge for mobile payment: A lot of people think it's a great idea, but they personally have no interest in doing it. It's great, though, they believe, for everybody else.

When Harris asked these questions of a demographically representative group of 2,383 adults Nov. 14-19, they probed into why this group didn't want to personally try mobile payment. The top answer, which speaks to the lack of incentives or discounts offered to shoppers to try mobile payments: "Don't see any reason to switch from cash or payment cards." That was followed closely by "Don't want to store sensitive information on my phone" and the always popular "I don't use a smartphone." All of those answers were selected by 50 percent to 52 percent of those polled.

Read Full Article