Executive Briefings

Pfizer to Build Biologics Plant in China Using GE's Time-Reducing Modular Construction Process

Pfizer will build a biologics plant in China, where it will make biosimilars for the Chinese market but also for sale throughout the world. The New York drugmaker has turned to GE for construction of the facility, which has developed a modular construction process that will cut the cost and allow the plant to be operational in about 18 months, instead of three years.

The $350m facility, which it is building at the Hangzhou Economic Development Area in China, will be Pfizer's third biologics production facility and its first in Asia. In addition to manufacturing, the facility will house Pfizer China’s Biosimilars and Biologics Quality, Technical Service, Logistics and Engineering divisions, and serve as a site for process development and clinical supplies. It will have about 150 employees when it is complete in 2018, the company said today in an announcement

The new center will be built using GE’s single-use technology in a KUBio modular facility, which Pfizer said will not only cut the time needed to build it compared to traditional construction from about three years to 18 months but will reduce the cost of construction by 25 percent to 50 percent. It said the plant will have fewer carbon dioxide emissions, and use about 75 percent less water and energy than a traditional facility.

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The $350m facility, which it is building at the Hangzhou Economic Development Area in China, will be Pfizer's third biologics production facility and its first in Asia. In addition to manufacturing, the facility will house Pfizer China’s Biosimilars and Biologics Quality, Technical Service, Logistics and Engineering divisions, and serve as a site for process development and clinical supplies. It will have about 150 employees when it is complete in 2018, the company said today in an announcement

The new center will be built using GE’s single-use technology in a KUBio modular facility, which Pfizer said will not only cut the time needed to build it compared to traditional construction from about three years to 18 months but will reduce the cost of construction by 25 percent to 50 percent. It said the plant will have fewer carbon dioxide emissions, and use about 75 percent less water and energy than a traditional facility.

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