Executive Briefings

Preparing for Tomorrow's MRO Supply Chain

In today's aerospace industry, maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) providers play much more than a supporting role. They are the key to manufacturers' ability to service a growing market of ever-greater complexity.

The MRO supply chain, which comprises millions of items, presents huge challenges for manufacturers and suppliers. They need to maintain the highest possible service levels, to minimize downtime of hugely expensive aircraft. At the same time, they must comply with a host of regulations.

These days, the picture is growing even more complex. Airlines and MRO providers find themselves grappling with increased globalization, a surge in the availability of data and analytics tools, new business models and cutting-edge technology, such as 3D printing.

Operators, such as UPS Airlines, rely on their supply chains to deliver the level of service and performance that customers expect. Key challenges include the need to shrink repair turnaround times and manage customs and brokerage, which differ widely from market to market.

The task is equally challenging for airlines’ MRO partners. The Flight Support Group of HEICO handles parts, repair, distribution and special products. Its chief concern lies in making and moving the right parts, in line with actual demand. Boeing subsidiary Aviall, the world’s largest provider of diversified aircraft parts and services, focuses on closing the planning and supply gaps between operators and OEMS.

In today's aerospace industry, maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) providers play much more than a supporting role. They are the key to manufacturers' ability to service a growing market of ever-greater complexity.

The MRO supply chain, which comprises millions of items, presents huge challenges for manufacturers and suppliers. They need to maintain the highest possible service levels, to minimize downtime of hugely expensive aircraft. At the same time, they must comply with a host of regulations.

These days, the picture is growing even more complex. Airlines and MRO providers find themselves grappling with increased globalization, a surge in the availability of data and analytics tools, new business models and cutting-edge technology, such as 3D printing.

Operators, such as UPS Airlines, rely on their supply chains to deliver the level of service and performance that customers expect. Key challenges include the need to shrink repair turnaround times and manage customs and brokerage, which differ widely from market to market.

The task is equally challenging for airlines’ MRO partners. The Flight Support Group of HEICO handles parts, repair, distribution and special products. Its chief concern lies in making and moving the right parts, in line with actual demand. Boeing subsidiary Aviall, the world’s largest provider of diversified aircraft parts and services, focuses on closing the planning and supply gaps between operators and OEMS.

Current and future trends in the aerospace MRO supply chain include the increased use of “power by the hour,” and the growth in international operations. Learn more about these trends by downloading a full summary of a panel discussion during a key aerospace industry event.