Executive Briefings

Railroads Said to Be Prepared for Increased Business Brought on by Panama Canal Expansion

Freight railroads are positioning themselves to meet future transportation demands in this country, including those related directly and indirectly to the expansion of the Panama Canal, Edward R. Hamberger, Association of American Railroads (AAR) president and CEO, told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

Railroads Said to Be Prepared for Increased Business Brought on by Panama Canal Expansion

The expansion project is designed to double shipping capacity via the canal by 2015, and facilitate larger "post-Panamax" container ships to pass, overcoming current size constraints.

Said Hamberger, "The fact is, whether the freight is coming into or leaving from Long Beach or Savannah or Miami or Houston or Seattle or Norfolk or any other major port, our nation's freight railroads are in a good position now, and are working diligently to be in an even better position in the future, to offer the safe, efficient, cost-effective service that their customers at ports and elsewhere want and need."

Hamberger said rail intermodal shipments are growing thanks to major private capital investments railroads have been making in equipment and facilities to improve efficiency, reliability and productivity for intermodal rail customers. The rail industry has seen a rise in intermodal volume from 3.1 million containers and trailers in 1980 to 12.3 million units in 2012.

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The expansion project is designed to double shipping capacity via the canal by 2015, and facilitate larger "post-Panamax" container ships to pass, overcoming current size constraints.

Said Hamberger, "The fact is, whether the freight is coming into or leaving from Long Beach or Savannah or Miami or Houston or Seattle or Norfolk or any other major port, our nation's freight railroads are in a good position now, and are working diligently to be in an even better position in the future, to offer the safe, efficient, cost-effective service that their customers at ports and elsewhere want and need."

Hamberger said rail intermodal shipments are growing thanks to major private capital investments railroads have been making in equipment and facilities to improve efficiency, reliability and productivity for intermodal rail customers. The rail industry has seen a rise in intermodal volume from 3.1 million containers and trailers in 1980 to 12.3 million units in 2012.

Read Full Article

Railroads Said to Be Prepared for Increased Business Brought on by Panama Canal Expansion