Executive Briefings

Report Sees Dramatic Increase of Ship Pollutants Fouling 'High Arctic' Over Next Ten Years

At current fuel sulfur levels, pollutant emissions from ships in part of the Arctic region could increase 150 to 600 percent by 2025, according to a report from the International Council of Clean Transportation.

"Marine vessels are a significant source of greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions, including CO2, NOX, SOX, particulate matter, and black carbon, which impact local air quality, human health, and the global climate," according to the report entitled Air Pollution from Marine Vessels in the U.S. High Arctic in 2025. "Since the record low Arctic sea ice extent recorded in September 2012, policy attention has increasingly focused on strategies for addressing shipping activity in the Arctic and the associated environmental impacts."

Policies that could constrain growth in emissions from Arctic shipping activity include requiring cleaner (i.e., lower sulfur content) marine fuels and expanding existing emission control areas for marine vessels.

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"Marine vessels are a significant source of greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions, including CO2, NOX, SOX, particulate matter, and black carbon, which impact local air quality, human health, and the global climate," according to the report entitled Air Pollution from Marine Vessels in the U.S. High Arctic in 2025. "Since the record low Arctic sea ice extent recorded in September 2012, policy attention has increasingly focused on strategies for addressing shipping activity in the Arctic and the associated environmental impacts."

Policies that could constrain growth in emissions from Arctic shipping activity include requiring cleaner (i.e., lower sulfur content) marine fuels and expanding existing emission control areas for marine vessels.

Read Full Article