Executive Briefings

RFID-Enabled Robot Counts Inventory at German Clothing Chain

German clothing chain Adler Modemärkte is among a handful of retailers using an RFID-enabled robot called Tory to count inventory and identify the locations of merchandise on store shelves each day. The robot and the software that manages the data it collects are provided by German technology firm MetraLabs.

Adler is carrying out a pilot project involving two Tory robots that it purchased, one for use within its store in the city of Erfurt and the other at the store located at its corporate headquarters in Haibach. The company plans to expand the deployment to other stores later this year. Adler, which already attaches passive EPC Gen 2 ultrahigh-frequency RFID tags to most merchandise it sells, has been using handheld readers at all of its 177 stores for some time, says Roland Leitz, the company's head of IT. Compared with manual or barcode-based inventory checks, he adds, checking inventory via RFID handhelds "speeds up stocktaking significantly." However, Leitz notes, because the process requires that an employee walk through store aisles and past shelves, waving the reader at nearby items, "it is manual work that ties up capacities of staff."

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Adler is carrying out a pilot project involving two Tory robots that it purchased, one for use within its store in the city of Erfurt and the other at the store located at its corporate headquarters in Haibach. The company plans to expand the deployment to other stores later this year. Adler, which already attaches passive EPC Gen 2 ultrahigh-frequency RFID tags to most merchandise it sells, has been using handheld readers at all of its 177 stores for some time, says Roland Leitz, the company's head of IT. Compared with manual or barcode-based inventory checks, he adds, checking inventory via RFID handhelds "speeds up stocktaking significantly." However, Leitz notes, because the process requires that an employee walk through store aisles and past shelves, waving the reader at nearby items, "it is manual work that ties up capacities of staff."

Read Full Article